Thousands protest outside Thai privy council chairman’s home – Asia Pacific

MonstersandCritics.com

Jul 22, 2007, 8:55 GMT

Bangkok – Thousands of anti-coup protesters on Sunday marched on former Thai prime minister Prem Tinsulanonda’s house in Bangkok to demand the senior statesman’s resignation as the top advisor to the country’s monarch.

About 10,000 members of the United Front of Democracy against Dictatorship (UDD) marched from Sanam Luang – the Royal Grounds – to Prem’s residence to demand he resign as chairman of the privy council to Thailand’s much-revered King Bhumibol Adulyadej.

The protesters were met by pro-Prem supporters who had lined up outside his house. Both sides were sporting yellow T-shirts, which has become a sign of reverence for King Bhumibol, whose special colour is yellow.

Prem, a former army commander-in-chief who was prime minister between 1979 to 1988, has been accused by the UDD as being the mastermind of the September 19 military coup that ousted former premier Thaksin Shinawatra.

The UDD, a loose coalition of anti-coup groups, charge that Prem abused his position at the privy council to interfere with Thai politics.

Thaksin, a billionaire businessman who introduced populist policies to Thailand’s system of money politics, was ousted by a military junta last year on charges of corruption and for dividing the nation.

Popular opinion continues to be devided on whether Thaksin, who was prime minister between 2001 to 2006, was a benefit or a bane to Thailand’s 75-year-old search for democracy, which has been derailed by numerous military coups.

The tension between the pro-Thaksin and anti-Thaksin camps is likely to intensify over coming months as Thailand gears up for a referendum on August 19 to decide the fate of the country’s 18th constitution. A general election is expected to be held in either November or December.

Besides staging anti-junta protests, the UDD has also launched a campaign to get the people to vote against the draft constitution written by a junta-appointed committee, arguing that it would weaken the political party system and grant amnesty to the coup makers.

‘If we can get people to vote no that will mean there will be no more coups,’ said Sant Hatthirat, a pro-democracy activist and advisor to the UDD.

The UDD hopes Thailand will revert to the 1997 constitution, which was revoked by the junta when it staged the September 19 coup.

Thousands protest outside Thai privy council chairman’s home – Asia-Pacific

image

Police and anti-coup protesters clash in Thai capital

Sun Jul 22, 2007 5:21PM BST

BANGKOK (Reuters) – Anti-coup protesters clashed with police in Bangkok on Sunday during a rally to demand the resignation of a top adviser to the king.

About 5,000 demonstrators took a 5-km march to the house of Prem Tinsulanonda, the chief adviser to King Bhumibol Adulyadej, accusing him of being the mastermind of the coup that removed Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra last year.

When police in riot gear tried to disperse the crowd outside Prem’s house, the protesters hurled rocks, water bottles and other objects at them, Thai television showed.

Photo

“Police are trying to control the situation, but the protesters are harming property,” a spokesman for the Council for National Security, as the coup leaders call themselves, told TITV television.

At least seven protesters were taken to hospital with minor head wounds and other injuries, hospital officials said.

“We will keep on fighting,” Jakrapob Penkair, a former Thaksin government spokesman who is now a key leader in the Democratic Alliance Against Dictatorship, told Reuters.

“The authorities tried to break up our protest without even trying to talk to us,” he said, vowing protests would continue.

At face value, the coup stems from middle-class street protests in 2006 against Thaksin’s autocratic style and huge personal wealth, which his opponents say he wielded unfairly to secure unassailable support from rural voters.

But analysts say it was as much about a royalist military and corporate elite removing a nouveau riche, ethnic Chinese businessman who had encroached too far

Thaksin was in New York at the time of the coup and has spent most of the interim in London, where he is buying an English football club, or travelling round Asia playing golf and giving interviews and lectures that have unnerved the generals.

Last week, Thaksin sued a military-appointed anti-graft panel for 50 billion baht (814 million pounds) in compensation for damage caused by its order to freeze $1.58 billion (730 million pounds) of his assets.

((Reporting by Khettiya Jittapong, editing by Darren Schuettler and Andrew Roche; Reuters Messaging, darren.schuettler.com@reuters.net; +66 2 648 97200)

//img.iht.com/images/v3/logo_all.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Thai police clash with anti-government protesters

The Associated Press

Published: July 22, 2007

BANGKOK, Thailand: Demonstrators opposed to Thailand’s military-installed government clashed with police Sunday night in the most violent protest since a military coup ousted the country’s elected government last September.

Several thousand protesters staged a rally outside the house of former Prime Minister Prem Tinsulanonda, whom they accuse of instigating last year’s coup against former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra. The protest was led by former top members of Thaksin’s now disbanded Thai Rak Thai party.

Prem is the top adviser to King Bhumibol Adulyadej, and the protesters demanded that he resign from that post.

The demonstrators broke through police barricades to march to the house, but more serious fighting between the two sides appeared to be triggered by an effort by police to detain the protest leaders as they spoke from a makeshift stage on top of a truck, according to video shown on Thai television.

The protesters first scuffled with police, then began throwing bottles and other objects at them as the security forces retreated from their effort to take the protest leaders.

There were no official reports of injuries or arrests, though nearby Vachira Hospital said between 20 and 30 people had come in with various injuries, about half of them policemen.

The neighborhood where the protest took place is in a district with military and government offices and is far from commercial areas of the Thai capital.

“The police have exercised utmost patience but they (the demonstrators) have tried in every way to hurt the security officials there and break through the blockades the police set up outside the house,” said Col. Sansern Kaewkamnerd, spokesman for the military’s Council for National Security. “They are trying to create chaos and cause a rift in society and we had to make sure that they don’t block traffic.”

The council is comprised of the military chiefs who staged last year’s coup and remain the power behind the interim government they installed. New elections are expected in December.

Sansern said there were 3,000-5,000 protesters, and charged that most were “misinformed” about the political situation, and that some were paid to take part. He said about 2,000 policemen were at the scene.

After the first main round of scuffling, the crowd partly dispersed, but protest leaders continued speaking from the top of the truck. Police retreated behind fences inside nearby army installations as the protest continued, but made occasional forays during which they clashed with demonstrators.

The protest leaders at one point sang the King’s Anthem — as a sign of patriotism — and called on the police not to hurt people.

“Police will take action against the leaders who instigated the situation,” said Sansern. “They have left us with no choice but to crack down, but the police are using the mildest means they can to control the situation.”

Bangkok police chief Lt. Gen. Adisorn Nontree said police would seek arrest warrants for eight protest leaders on Monday.

Scotsman.com News

Police and anti-coup protesters clash in Thai capital

image

Thai police clash with anti-government protesters
Sunday, July 22, 2007 11:21 PM

BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) – Demonstrators opposed to Thailand’s military-installed government clashed with police yesterday night in the most violent protest since a military coup ousted an elected government last September.
Several thousand protesters staged a rally outside the home of former Prime Minister Prem Tinsulanonda, whom they accuse of instigating last year’s coup against former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra. The protest was led by former top members of Thaksin’s now disbanded Thai Rak Thai party.
Protesters broke through police barricades to march to the house, but more serious fighting between the two sides appeared to be triggered by an effort by police to detain the protest leaders while they spoke from a stage, according to video shown on Thai television.
The protesters first scuffled with police, then began throwing bottles and other objects at them as the security forces retreated from their effort to take the protest leaders.
There were no immediate reports of injuries or arrests.

image

Anti-coup protest held in Thailand

SUNDAY, JULY 22, 2007
20:02 MECCA TIME, 17:02 GMT

Police in riot gear tried to disperse the crowd
outside Prem’s house [Reuters]

Thousands of protesters demanding the resignation of an adviser to the king have clashed with police in Bangkok, the Thai capital.

About 5,000 demonstrators marched to the house of Prem Tinsulanonda, the king’s chief adviser, on Sunday accusing him of masterminding last year’s coup that removed Thaksin Shinawatra, the former prime minister.

Police in riot gear tried to disperse the crowd outside Prem’s house.

“Police are trying to control the situation, but the protesters are harming property,” a spokesman for the Council for National Security, the name the coup leaders have given themselves, told Thai television.

Thai television showed the protesters hurling rocks, water bottles and other objects.

At least seven protesters were taken to hospital with minor head wounds and other injuries, hospital officials said.

Protests will continue

Jakrapob Penkair, a former Thaksin government spokesman who is now a key leader in the Democratic Alliance Against Dictatorship, said: “The authorities tried to break up our protest without even trying to talk to us.”

He vowed the protests would continue.

Some have said the coup stemmed from middle-class street protests in 2006 against Thaksin’s autocratic style and huge personal wealth, which his opponents said he used to secure the support of rural voters.

But other analysts say it was as much about a royalist military and corporate elite removing a moneyed, ethnic Chinese businessman who had encroached too far on their traditional turf.

Thaksin was in New York at the time of the coup and has spent most of his time since he was toppled from power in London, where he is buying English football club Manchester City.

He has also travelled round Asia playing golf and giving interviews and lectures that have unnerved the coup leaders.

Last week, Thaksin sued a military-appointed anti-corruption panel for $1.5bn in compensation for damage caused by its order to freeze $1.58bn of his assets.

image

Thai police clash with anti-government protesters

BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) – Demonstrators opposed to Thailand’s military-installed government clashed with police Sunday night in the most violent protest since a military coup ousted an elected government last September.
Several thousand protesters staged a rally outside the home of former Prime Minister Prem Tinsulanonda, whom they accuse of instigating last year’s coup against former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra. The protest was led by former top members of Thaksin’s now disbanded Thai Rak Thai party.
Protesters broke through police barricades to march to the house, but more serious fighting between the two sides appeared to be triggered by an effort by police to detain the protest leaders while they spoke from a stage, according to video shown on Thai television.
The protesters first scuffled with police, then began throwing bottles and other objects at them as the security forces retreated from their effort to take the protest leaders.
There were no immediate reports of injuries or arrests.

Thai police clash with demonstrators protesting military-installed government

Thai police clash with demonstrators protesting military-installed government

Thai police clash with demonstrators protesting military-installed government
By SUTIN WANNABOVORN – Associated Press Writer
© AP

2007-07-22 20:18:31 –

BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) – Demonstrators opposed to Thailand’s military-installed government clashed with police Sunday night in the most violent protest since a military coup ousted the country’s elected government last September.

Several thousand protesters staged a rally outside the house of former Prime Minister Prem Tinsulanonda, whom they accuse of instigating last year’s coupagainst former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra.

The demonstrators broke through police barricades to march to the house, but more serious fighting between the two sides developed after police tried to detain the protest leaders as they spoke from a makeshift stage on top of a truck.

Sporadic charges by police set off street fighting and wild chases through the area, a usually quiet district with military and government offices that is far from commercial areas of the Thai capital. Police responded with pepper spray.

The protest was led by former top members of Thaksin’s now disbanded Thai Rak Thai party.

Prem is the top adviser to King Bhumibol Adulyadej, and the protesters demanded that he resign from that post.

The demonstrators left the area voluntarily at about 11:30 p.m., about three hours after the violence began.

Nearby Vachira Hospital said about 30 people had come in with various injuries, about half of them policemen. Witnesses said dozens of other people were also hurt.

Police Col. Kamonsanti Klanbut, a police chief in the Sansaen district where the clashes occurred, said at least five protesters were arrested.

After the first police effort to detain the protest leaders failed, the crowd began throwing bottles and other objects at the security forces as they retreated.

«The police have exercised utmost patience but they (the demonstrators) have tried in every way to hurt the security officials there and break through the blockades the police set up outside the house,» said Col. Sansern Kaewkamnerd, spokesman for the military’s Council for National Security. «They are trying to create chaos and cause a rift in society and we had to make sure that they don’t block traffic.

The council is comprised of the military chiefs who staged last year’s coup and remain the power behind the interim government they installed. New elections are expected in December.

Sansern said there were 3,000-5,000 protesters, and charged that most were «misinformed» about the political situation, and that some were paid to take part. He said about 2,000 policemen were present.

Although the police appeared to exercise restraint, protest leaders accused them of abuse.

«The police didn’t try to negotiate with protest leaders at all,» said Anukorn Waithanomsak, a protest organizer. «Policemen definitely overreacted … they beat protesters up with batons and dozens of protesters were injured.
The protest leaders at one point sang the King’s Anthem _ as a sign of patriotism _ and called on the police not to hurt people.

Military spokesman Sansern said police would take action against the protest leaders.
«They have left us with no choice but to crack down, but the police are using the mildest means they can to control the situation,» he said.
Bangkok police chief Lt. Gen. Adisorn Nontree said police would seek arrest warrants for 10 protest leaders on Monday.

The Sept. 19 coup was welcomed by many who had wearied of Thaksin’s autocratic style and his alleged corruption and abuse of power. An interim government led by a respected former army commander, Surayud Chulanont, was appointed, as was an interim legislature and a committee to draft a new constitution.

But in recent months, the popularity of the military-installed government has declined and there have been increasing calls for a relaxation of political restrictions imposed by the military.

Press release: www.pr-inside.com

image

Thai pro-democracy protesters charged after violent clashes with police

BANGKOK (Thomson Financial) – Six pro-democracy protesters have been arrested after overnight clashes with police left scores injured in the first violent protest against last year’s coup, police said Monday.

The six have been charged with disturbing the peace, damaging government property and injuring police officers, Bangkok police spokesman Supisarn Bhakdinaruenart said.

He declined to say how many people were injured in Sunday’s clashes, in which protesters threw rocks, sticks and other objects at riot police, who responded with teargas, water canons and batons to break up the demonstration.

Bangkok’s Narenthorn emergency center said 106 people had received treatment for mostly minor injuries, including 77 police.

The clashes began after about 5,000 protesters — many of them supporters of ousted prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra — began marching from the plaza where they have been holding nightly rallies since early June, according to police.

Police blocked their way as they headed to the nearby home of Prem Tinasulanond, the king’s top adviser, who has been accused by Thaksin’s allies of masterminding the coup last September.

Violence flared sporadically for about two-and-a-half hours.

Protest organisers have so far declined to comment but have planned a press conference for later Monday.

Thaksin’s allies have staged the protests to demand that the junta step down and that elections be held immediately.

Earlier this month, the junta unveiled a new constitution that they say will guide Thailand towards elections before the end of the year.

The charter is set to go to a referendum next month, in what will be the junta’s first test at the ballot box since the takeover in September.

afp/mb

 

image

Thai police clash with anti-coup protesters
Posted: 23 July 2007 0006 hrs


Thai policemen keep vigil as anti-coup protesters rally during a demonstration.

BANGKOK : Protesters demonstrating against last year’s coup in Thailand clashed with police on Sunday as riot police used tear gas and shields to break up thousands of people marching through Bangkok, officials said.

The demonstration was the most violent one yet against the military that seized power in a coup last September, but police said only a few people suffered minor injuries.

Three people were arrested, but police said they would seek arrest warrants for the protest leaders on Monday.

The clashes began after about 5,000 protesters – mainly supporters of ousted prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra – began marching from the plaza where they have been holding nightly rallies since early June, according to police.

Police blocked their way as they headed to the nearby home of Prem Tinasulanond, the king’s top adviser, who has been accused by Thaksin’s allies of masterminding the coup last September.

Protesters began throwing rocks and bottles of water, but police responded with tear gas and pressed back the crowd with their shields. The standoff lasted about two and a half hours.

“Police will issue arrest warrants for the protest leaders tomorrow, as they have created some disturbances tonight,” Bangkok’s deputy police chief Major General Pongsak Eaimorn told AFP.

The spokesman for the military, Colonel Sunsern Kaewkumnerd, said the situation was under control and that the injuries were minor.
“Demonstrators tried to provoke policemen. They threw rocks and bottles of water at the police,” he said.
“The situation is not a concern. I believe police can keep it under control,” he added.
Thaksin’s allies have staged the protests to demand that the military step down and that elections be held immediately. The demonstrations have been largely peaceful, and have rarely attracted more than a few thousand people.
Earlier this month, the military unveiled a new constitution that they say will guide Thailand towards elections before the end of the year.

The charter is set to go to a referendum next month, in what will be the military’s first test at the ballot box.

Thaksin, who has lived in exile since the coup, has been barred from standing in the elections.

A military-appointed court has disbanded his political party, while anti-corruption authorities have frozen more than US$1.5 billion of his assets. – AFP/de

 

 //us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/us/nt/ma/ma_nws_1.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

image 

Thai police clash with anti-coup protesters

BANGKOK (AFP) – Protesters demonstrating against last year’s coup in Thailand clashed with police late Sunday as riot police used tear gas and shields to break up thousands of people marching through Bangkok, officials said.

The demonstration was the most violent one yet against the junta that seized power in a coup last September, but police said only a few people suffered minor injuries.

Three people were arrested, but police said they would seek arrest warrants for the protest leaders on Monday.

The clashes began after about 5,000 protesters — mainly supporters of ousted prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra — began marching from the plaza where they have been holding nightly rallies since early June, according to police.

Police blocked their way as they headed to the nearby home of Prem Tinasulanond, the king’s top adviser, who has been accused by Thaksin’s allies of masterminding the coup last September.

Protesters began throwing rocks and bottles of water, but police responded with tear gas and pressed back the crowd with their shields. The standoff lasted about two and a half hours.

“Police will issue arrest warrants for the protest leaders tomorrow, as they have created some disturbances tonight,” Bangkok’s deputy police chief Major General Pongsak Eaimorn told AFP.

The spokesman for the junta, Colonel Sunsern Kaewkumnerd, said the situation was under control and that the injuries were minor.

“Demonstrators tried to provoke policemen. They threw rocks and bottles of water at the police,” he said.

“The situation is not a concern. I believe police can keep it under control,” he added.

Thaksin’s allies have staged the protests to demand that the junta step down and that elections be held immediately. The demonstrations have been largely peaceful, and have rarely attracted more than a few thousand people.

Earlier this month, the junta unveiled a new constitution that they say will guide Thailand towards elections before the end of the year.

The charter is set to go to a referendum next month, in what will be the junta’s first test at the ballot box.

Thaksin, who has lived in exile since the coup, has been barred from standing in the elections.

A military-appointed court has disbanded his political party, while anti-corruption authorities have frozen more than 1.5 billion dollars of his assets.

image

Thai police clash with protesters

An anti-coup protester clashes with police in the Thai capital Bangkok

Police used tear gas and a baton charge to disperse the protesters

Several thousand protesters opposed to Thailand’s military-backed government have clashed with police in the capital, Bangkok.

The crowd staged a rally outside the house of Prem Tinsulanonda, a senior adviser to Thailand’s king.

The protesters say Mr Prem was behind a bloodless coup which removed former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra.

Rocks and bottles of water were thrown at police, in the most violent demonstration since the 2006 coup.

 

image

 

Bangkok Police Arrest Six After Protest Turns Violent (Update2)

By Beth Jinks and Anuchit Nguyen

July 23 (Bloomberg) — Thai police arrested six people during clashes involving anti-government protesters in Bangkok late yesterday. Authorities today confined any protests or rallies to approved areas and banned street marches.

Police have video and other evidence that those detained were involved in “attacking police and damaging public property,” Adisorn Nonsee, head of the Bangkok police, told state-owned Radio Thailand early today. “We have been very patient in the past. But last night, the protesters reached an unacceptable point.” Protest organizers blamed police for triggering the violence.

Prime Minister Surayud Chulanont has repeatedly warned he will impose emergency measures in the capital if protests turn violent. Rallies led by the United Front of Democracy against Dictatorship, calling for the resignation of the junta and its installed government, have so far been peaceful.

The military ousted the government of former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra in a coup in September. Army chief and junta leader Sondhi Boonyarataklin, who led last year’s coup, told Radio Thailand he would meet with the premier and security officials today to decide whether to impose emergency rule in the capital.

“The protesters have a clear objective, to trigger turmoil in the country,” Sondhi said today.

Crowd Reacted

Protesters reacted when police tried to arrest more than 20 leaders who were addressing the crowd from the tops of trucks, said a spokeswoman for the United Front, who identified herself only by her nickname Pop.

About 43 protesters and members of the public were injured and three remain in hospital, Pop said. While no members of the United Front were detained, other protesters may have been arrested, she said.

Police started the violence “when they dropped pepper bombs,” Pop said via telephone today. “Once it’s out you get hurt, your eyes are burning. That caused public anger.”

Anyone organizing street protests will face arrest under “strictly enforced” existing laws, Prayuth Chan-ocha, commander of the First Army Region, told military-owned radio. Rallies will now be confined to designated areas including Sanam Luang park, where Bangkok protests are traditionally held.

Inciting Military

Protesters are trying to incite the military to violence to “ignite hatred against the army” and garner support for their cause, he said.

“The situation is under control by the police. There is no need for the army’s intervention,” Prayuth said. “They are tempting the army to impose emergency rule that will lead to blame from other people, especially the international community.”

Police officers and protesters were injured when as many as 5,000 demonstrators, some throwing rocks and stones, attacked barricades outside the home of Prem Tinsulanonda, head of the king’s privy council, late yesterday.

Police used tear gas and water from fire engines to disperse the crowd and attempted to arrest leaders of anti- government groups, whom they accuse of inciting violence, Nation Channel reported. Footage of the confrontation aired on most state-controlled television stations.

Soldiers were placed on alert. They weren’t needed as police gained control of the area and many protesters returned to Sanam Luang, Prayuth told military run Channel 5 late yesterday. Clashes ended about 11 p.m. Bangkok time.

Some groups that oppose the government have mounted petitions and organized rallies seeking the removal of Prem as chief adviser to Thailand’s King Bhumibol Adulyadej. The protesters accuse Prem of being involved in the coup.

Last Updated: July 23, 2007 00:08 EDT

image

Anti-Coup Protesters, Police Clash in Thai Capital

By VOA News
22 July 2007

Thais gather for an anti-coup government rally in Bangkok, 22 July 2007

Thais gather for an anti-coup government rally in Bangkok, 22 July 2007

About 5,000 demonstrators opposed to Thailand’s military-installed government clashed with police in Bangkok Sunday and demanded the resignation of a top adviser to the king.

The protesters, mainly supporters of Thailand’s former prime minister, staged a rally outside the home of Prem Tinsulanonda, chief adviser to King Bhumibol Adulyadej, accusing him of masterminding the coup last September that ousted government chief Thaksin Shinawatra.

When police tried to disperse the crowd, the protesters hurled rocks, bottles and other objects at them.

Hospital sources say at least 30 people, including police officers, were treated for various injuries.

Organizers of the protest accused authorities of overreacting, saying the authorities did not try to negotiate with protest leaders.

Thai military leaders seized power when Mr. Thaksin was out of the country. They accused him of corruption and abuse of power.

An interim government appointed by Thailand’s military leaders has issued a new constitution intended to guide the country toward elections by the end of this year. A referendum on the charter will be the public’s first opportunity to cast a vote on the past year’s upheaval.

Most of those involved in Sunday’s protest were members of the former ruling political party Thai Rak Thai, which has been disbanded. Thaksin, who was the party leader, has been barred from taking part in future elections; he has said he will remain outside Thailand until democracy returns.

Some information for this report was provided by AP and Reuters.

image

Bangkok Police Arrest Six After Protest Turns Violent (Update1)
Bloomberg –

By Beth Jinks and Anuchit Nguyen July 23 (Bloomberg) — Thai police arrested six people during clashes involving anti-government protesters in Bangkok late


Thai police clash with protesters

BBC News, UK –

Several thousand protesters opposed to Thailand’s military-backed government have clashed with police in the capital, Bangkok.

Anti-coup government demonstrators clash with Bangkok police
Canada East, Canada –

BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) – Police said they would seek arrest warrants Monday for the leaders of a protest rally against Thailand’s military-installed

Police and Protesters Clash in Thailand
Infoshop News –

Anti-government protesters retreated from in front of the residence of Privy Council president Prem Tinsulanonda late last night after clashing three times

Thousands protest at Thai privy council chairman’s home (Roundup)
Monsters and Critics.com, UK –

Bangkok – Thousands of anti-coup protesters on Sunday protested outside former Thai prime minister Prem Tinsulanonda’s house in Bangkok, demanding the

Thaksin Files Lawsuit against Thai Anti-graft Body
The Irrawaddy News Magazine, Thailand – Jul 20, 2007
By AP Ousted Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra has filed a lawsuit against Thailand’s anti-graft body after it froze more than 65 billion baht (US $2.1

Thai police charge 6 after anti-coup protest turns violent, seek
International Herald Tribune, France –

AP BANGKOK, Thailand: Police filed charges Monday against an alleged ringleader and five other suspects involved in an anti-coup rally in the Thai capital


Violence at Thai anti-coup protest
Aljazeera.net, Qatar –

Police in Thailand say they plan to seek arrest warrants for the leaders of an anti-coup demonstration which ended in violent clashes and left dozens of


Anti-Coup Protesters, Police Clash in Thai Capital
Voice of America –

By VOA News About 5000 demonstrators opposed to Thailand’s military-installed government clashed with police in Bangkok Sunday and demanded the resignation

Police, anti-coup protesters clash in Bangkok
ABC Online, Australia –

Anti-coup protesters clashed with police in Thailand’s capital during a rally to demand the resignation of a top adviser to the king.

Police, anti-coup protesters clash in Thai capital
Reuters India, India –

BANGKOK (Reuters) – Anti-coup protesters clashed with police in Thailand’s capital on Sunday during a rally to demand the resignation of a top adviser to

Thai police clash with anti-government protesters
International Herald Tribune, France –

AP BANGKOK, Thailand: Demonstrators opposed to Thailand’s military-installed government clashed with police Sunday night in the most violent protest since a


Thaksin appeals against asset freeze
NDTV.com, India – Jul 19, 2007
AP Ousted Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra has filed a lawsuit against Thailand’s anti-graft body after it froze more than $2.1 billion of his family’s

More than 100 injured in anti-junta demonstration
Monsters and Critics.com, UK –
Bangkok – More than 100 anti-junta demonstrators and police were injured in a clash over the weekend outside the home of former Thai prime minister Prem

Thai coup protestors call for elections
Radio Australia, Australia –

Demonstrators opposed to Thailand’s military-installed government have staged their most violent protest since last year’s coup.

Thaksin supporters clash with police outside home of king’s adviser
South China Morning Post (subscription), Hong Kong –
Demonstrators opposed to Thailand’s military-installed government clashed with police last night in the most violent protest since a military coup ousted

Thailand police embroiled in riot
Malaysia Sun, Malaysia –

Rocks and other missiles were thrown at police in the most violent demonstration since the 2006 political coup. The crowd, opposed to Thailand’s

Thai anti-coup protesters march to Privy Council president’s residence
People’s Daily Online, China 

Some 3000 anti-coup protesters marched Sunday afternoon to the Sisao Theves residence of Thailand ‘s Privy Council President Prem Tinsulanonda,

Anti-coup protest held in Thailand
MWC News, Canada –

By Agencies Thousands of protesters demanding the resignation of an adviser to the king have clashed with police in Bangkok, the Thai capital.

Thousands protest in Bangkok
TV3 News, New Zealand 
More than forty people have been injured as thousands of protesters clashed with police last night in Bangkok. An estimated 5000 people took to the streets

image

Six Thais Charged After Violent Anti-Coup Protest

By Roger Wilkison
Bangkok
23 July 2007

Wilkison report (mp3) – Download 549k audio clip
Listen to Wilkison report (mp3) audio clip

Thai police have arrested and charged six people following a protest against last year’s military coup that turned violent Sunday night, and they say more arrests are likely. From Bangkok, Roger Wilkison reports more than 100 people – policemen and protesters alike – were injured in clashes between the demonstrators and security forces.

Anti-coup protesters and supporters of ousted PM Thaksin Shinawatra listen to speeches of organizers during a rally after they clashed with police at the Royal Ground in Bangkok 23 July 2007

Anti-coup protesters and supporters of ousted PM Thaksin Shinawatra listen to speeches of organizers during a rally after they clashed with police at the Royal Ground in Bangkok, 23 July 2007

It was the first violent protest against the coup that last September overthrew then-Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, whom the military accused of corruption and abuse of power.

The protesters initially gathered on the parade ground in front of the royal palace.  They were stirred up by orators demanding a return to democracy and the resignation of retired General Prem Tinsulanonda, a former prime minister who is now the top adviser to Thailand’s king.  Thaksin supporters and pro-democracy activists accuse the octogenarian Mr. Prem of masterminding last year’s coup.

About 5,000 demonstrators marched to Mr. Prem’s home in a usually quiet area of government offices, where they encountered a police blockade.  As officers dressed in riot gear tried to disperse the crowd, the protesters began throwing rocks, water bottles and other objects at them.  The police then charged the demonstrators, firing pepper spray.  That set off street fighting and chases throughout the area.

Thais gather for an anti-coup government rally in Bangkok, 22 July 2007

Thais gather for an anti-coup government rally in Bangkok, 22 July 2007

The demonstrators – mostly pro-Thaksin elements but also including pro-democracy activists and disaffected students – vowed to mount further demonstrations to demand Mr. Prem’s resignation as head of the royal Privy Council.  But the authorities say that from now on, such demonstrations will not be allowed to move around the city, and must stay at the royal palace parade ground.

Some Thais, like this man who witnessed the clashes outside Mr. Prem’s home, say the government needs to crack down on violent demonstrators.

He says preventive measures like those announced on Monday will not work because the mob “will just continue to resort to violence.”

But General Sonthi Boonyaratglin, the head of the army and of the junta that now runs the country, says the situation is under control and there is no need to take stronger measures like imposing a state of emergency.

The six people under arrest have been charged with causing chaos, obstructing the work of authorities and damaging state property.  Warrants have been issued for the arrest of at least eight other people involved in the protest.

Thailand is gearing up for a referendum on August 19 to vote yes or no on a new constitution drawn up by a military-appointed drafting committee.  A general election is expected in either November or December.

 

International Herald Tribune

Thai police charge 6 after anti-coup protest turns violent in Bangkok

The Associated Press

Published: July 23, 2007

BANGKOK: Hours after a protest that turned into a three-hour melee that injured at least 270 people, Thailand on Monday charged six people in connection with the incident, the most violent anti-coup demonstrations to hit Thailand since the military takeover last year.

Thousands of protesters and police officers squared off Sunday in the Thai capital, leaving about 200 officers and 70 demonstrators injured.

The protest against Thailand’s military-installed government took place outside the home of former Prime Minister Prem Tinsulanonda, said the Bangkok police chief, Lieutenant General Adisorn Nontree.

Two police officers were severely injured, Adisorn said in an interview by telephone.

Several thousand people rallied outside the house of Prem, whom the protesters accused of instigating the coup that overthrew Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra in September. They called for Prem, who was home at the time, to resign as top adviser to King Bhumibol Adulyadej.

A police official said that six suspects had been charged with “causing chaos, obstructing the work of authorities, and damage of state property, and they include a protest leader.”

Adisorn said officials would seek arrest warrants Monday or Tuesday for eight more organizers of the rally, six of whom were top members of Thaksin’s now disbanded Thai Rak Thai party.

The most serious fighting occurred when the police tried to detain protest leaders as they spoke from a makeshift stage on top of a truck.

After the first police effort to detain the protest leaders failed, the crowd began throwing bottles and other objects at the security forces as they retreated.

Sporadic charges by police officers using pepper spray set off street fighting and chases through the area, a usually quiet Bangkok district filled with military and government offices, far from commercial areas of the Thai capital.

About 2,000 police officers battled as many as 5,000 protesters in the demonstration, said Colonel Sansern Kaewkamnerd, a spokesman for the military’s Council for National Security.

The council comprises the top military officers who helped foment the coup, and it remains the power behind the interim government that was subsequently installed. New elections are expected in December.

The demonstrators left the area voluntarily about three hours after the violence began.

The Sept. 19 coup came after a series of popular protests calling for Thaksin to resign amid accusations of corruption and abuse of power. An interim government led by a respected former army commander, Surayud Chulanont, was appointed to oversee elections, along with a committee to draft a new constitution.

But in recent months, the popularity of the military-installed government has declined and there have been increasing calls for a relaxation of political and social restrictions.

image

Police Charge Six
After Violence
At a Thai Protest

ASSOCIATED PRESS
July 24, 2007

BANGKOK, Thailand — Police filed charges against an alleged ringleader and five other people accused of involvement in an antigovernment rally in the Thai capital that turned violent and left 270 injured.

Meanwhile, protest leaders said they would file assault charges today against the police.

“The judicial system will be our last hope,” said Nattawut Saikua, a leader of the protest, which was organized by supporters of former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, ousted by a coup last September.

Bangkok police chief Lt. Gen. Adisorn Nontree said about 200 police officers and 70 protesters were hurt in clashes Sunday night when several thousand people demonstrated outside the Bangkok home of former Prime Minister Prem Tinsulanonda. Two police officers were severely injured, Lt. Gen. Adisorn said in a telephone interview.

The protesters accuse Mr. Prem of instigating the coup that ousted Mr. Thaksin and they demand that he resign his position as top adviser to King Bhumibol Adulyadej.

Mr. Prem, 86 years old, is also a former army commander, and continues to command the respect of many in the military, including the group that staged last year’s coup. He was at home as the tumult raged outside Sunday.

The arrested suspects were charged with “causing chaos, obstructing the work of authorities, and damage of state property, and they include a protest leader, Noparut Worachitwutikul,” police Col. Supisan Pakdeenarunart told the Associated Press.

Copyright © 2007 Associated Press

ใส่ความเห็น

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / เปลี่ยนแปลง )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / เปลี่ยนแปลง )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / เปลี่ยนแปลง )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / เปลี่ยนแปลง )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: