Thousands protest against Thai military-installed government


Posted: 20 May 2007 2328 hrs

 
 

Photos 1 of 1

Anti-coup protesters, wearing T-shirts supporting ousted Thai premier Thaksin Shinawatra.

   
 

BANGKOK : Up to 3,000 people took to the streets of Bangkok on
Sunday to protest against Thailand’s military-installed government and
call for early elections in the kingdom, organisers and the police
said.

The demonstrators, who were rallying against a coup last September,
gathered at Sanam Luang plaza in central Bangkok in the early evening
before peacefully marching to the Democracy Monument a few kilometres
away.

“The demonstration is to show that we do not agree with coup and to
kick out the junta,” said one of the rally’s organisers, Nattawut
Saikuar, who is a supporter of ousted premier Thaksin Shinawatra.

He urged the military-installed government to hold elections as
early as possible. The government has promised polls for the end of the
year.

Nattawut said 5,000 people joined the demonstration, but police estimated the figure at about 3,000.

Police major general Manit Wongsomboon said that 600 police
officers were posted at Sanam Luang, while 300 police stood guard at
the Democracy Monument.

Nobody was arrested and there was no violence, he said.

Sunday’s protest came as Thai authorities appeared to be cracking
down on dissent, detaining three supporters of Thaksin on Friday and
closing three radio stations that broadcast statements by the ousted
leader.

Demonstrations against the government are also becoming more
frequent, with a similar protest at the end of April attracting at
least 4,000 people.

The protest movement is also beginning to create an odd coalition
of allies, with some pro-democracy groups, which last year demonstrated
against Thaksin, now joining forces with his allies in protesting
against the government.

– AFP/de

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Thousands protest against Thai junta


Web posted at: 5/21/2007 2:50:26

Source ::: AFP


BANGKOK
• Up to 3,000 people took to the streets of Bangkok yesterday to
protest against Thailand’s military junta and call for early elections
in the kingdom, organisers and the police said.


The demonstrators, who were rallying against a coup last September,
gathered at Sanam Luang plaza in central Bangkok in the early evening
before peacefully marching to the Democracy Monument a few kilometres
away.


“The demonstration is to show that we do not agree with coup and to kick out
the junta,” said one of the rally’s organisers, Nattawut Saikuar, who
is a supporter of ousted premier Thaksin Shinawatra.


He urged the junta to hold elections as early as possible. The
military-installed government has promised polls for the end of the
year.


Nattawut said 5,000 people joined the demonstration, but police estimated the figure at about 3,000.


Police major general Manit Wongsomboon said that six hundred police officers
were posted at Sanam Luang, while 300 police stood guard at the
Democracy Monument.


Nobody was arrested and there was no violence, he said.


Sunday’s protest came as Thai authorities appeared to be cracking down on
dissent, detaining three supporters of Thaksin on Friday and closing
three radio stations that broadcast statements by the ousted leader.

Photo : Bansai Villager

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Thousands in rally against Thai junta

Published: Monday, 21 May, 2007, 08:35 AM Doha Time

Anti-coup protesters during a demonstration in Bangkok yesterday

BANGKOK:
Up to 3,000 people took to the streets of Bangkok yesterday to protest
against Thailand’s military junta and call for early elections in the
kingdom, organisers and the police said.
The demonstrators, who were
rallying against a coup last September, gathered at Sanam Luang plaza
in central Bangkok in the early evening before peacefully marching to
the Democracy Monument a few kilometres away.
“The demonstration is
to show that we do not agree with coup and to kick out the junta,” said
one of the rally’s organisers, Nattawut Saikuar, who is a supporter of
ousted premier Thaksin Shinawatra.
He urged the junta to hold
elections as early as possible. The military-installed government has
promised polls for the end of the year.
Nattawut said 5,000 people joined the demonstration, but police estimated the figure at about 3,000.
Police
major general Manit Wongsomboon said that six hundred police officers
were posted at Sanam Luang, while 300 police stood guard at the
Democracy Monument.
Nobody was arrested and there was no violence, he said.
Yesterday’s
protest came as Thai authorities appeared to be cracking down on
dissent, detaining three supporters of Thaksin on Friday and closing
three radio stations that broadcast statements by the ousted leader.
Demonstrations against the junta are also becoming more frequent, with
a similar protest at the end of April attracting at least 4,000 people.
The
protest movement is also beginning to create an odd coalition of
allies, with some pro-democracy groups, which last year demonstrated
against Thaksin, now joining forces with his allies.

YALA, Thailand:
Suspected Muslim militants shot dead a Buddhist construction worker and
set his body ablaze in Thailand’s troubled south and in a separate
attack detonated two bombs that wounded 11 people, police said
yesterday.
The dead man was killed as he worked on a highway in
Pattani, one of three southern provinces beset by three years of
separatist insurgency in which more than 2,100 people have been killed.
Officers said the man’s excavator was also set alight.
A few hours
later in the nearby province of Narathiwat, two remote-controlled bombs
detonated 15 minutes apart near a market, wounding seven police and
defence volunteers and four civilians, police said.
Some of victims were caught as they rushed to the scene of the first blast caused when the small home-made bomb exploded.
Despite
the violence and growing calls from the Buddhist majority for a tough
crackdown Prime Minister Chulanont insists he is committed to a
peaceful resolution.–Reuters

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